Tag Archive | social inequality

Overhaul of the ESA

I’ve talked about this before, and I am probably a broken record on the topic by now. But this is such an important topic that I can’t help continually bring it up.

Work, that’s important. We spend more than 8 hours of our day doing this thing called Work, and the money we earn from it is what keeps us alive, feeds our families, houses us and clothes us. It also determines our lifestyle, our ability to be happy, and is a enormous factor in our health and therefore the quality and length of our lives.

Steve Jobs Work Quote

I say its more than important, and very worth talking about.

You see, in 2009 I made a huge decision for myself. After working crappy jobs for almost a decade that I hated and paid miserably, I looked at a career change to turn my life around. I knew I wanted to help people, that I was a great communicator and wanted to work for a non-profit. I learned about the Career and Work Counselling Program at George Brown and thought to myself “Hey, what better way to help people than to teach them how to find work. I’ll be supporting them in one of the most important areas of their lives! That’s pretty meaningful. I can do that.”

Even back then I sensed that the world of work was broken in many places. If I was miserable, and faced many barriers to a better life, I was sure others were going through the same thing too. And deep down, I wanted to be a part of fixing that.

Six years later and I have sound knowledge and stats to back up my gut feeling from back then: the employment world is truly broken and I can hold up the X-Rays and point out the multitude of fracture points and explain what causes them. And no shocker, Karl Marx was right all along and this does not bode well for the 1%.

I can write about what’s wrong with the labour market for days, but today I want to focus on one of the fracture points, and this one relates to a problem in our own backyard (lets leave Global Factors for another day): The Employment Standards Act (ESA) right here in Ontario.

So back in 2014, when the Liberal Government was re-elected into Parliament under Premier Wayne, one of the promises in the Throne Speech was to focus on employment, and in response the Minister of Labour, Kevin Flynn (this guy), decided to launch on February 17, 2015, a full public consultation on the ESA under what they called The Changing Workplaces Review.

The purpose of this review was to evaluate the changes to the workplace due to globalization, advances in technology, the surge in new job roles, etc, etc.

 

The Toronto Star has actually been covering this topic and I have been faithfully following along. In fact,   has been running a series on the ESA and how it affects workers in our city (read her work here, here and today’s article here).

What I find most interesting, in fact even laughable, is that we really don’t need to update the Employment Standards Act to reflect today’s times or 2016.

We need to update it to reflect, umm, I dunno, the 1970’s, or the 1920’s.

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Decades later…still relevant!

Here’s a favourite quote from the Employment Standards official government webpage that further illustrates my point:

“If you are employed in Ontario, you are PROBABLY protected by the ESA”.

Probably. As in “maybe”. Oh, also, good luck navigating all the different guides on the website to figure out if you are covered based on the type of employment you have, or what the ESA even covers in terms of protections and all the different exceptions and loopholes that employers use all the time to take advantage of and exploit Ontario Workers.

probably

We are in a wealthy country, we have a huge workforce and companies in Canada profiting billions upon billions every year, yet somehow our employment policies don’t even protect us from being fired without cause, being paid for overtime, allows all workers the rights to unpaid, let alone paid sick leave, all workers access to minimum wage, or even a minimum wage above the poverty level, and the few protections the ESA does boast, it doesn’t even properly enforce.

The worst part is that Ontario’s weak policies actually ruin lives. And I wouldn’t doubt for a second costs our government billions on the social and health spending that are consequences of this.

We complain about all the taxes we pay in Ontario, and how we worry about all the Government spending we do to implement social programs and anti-poverty initiatives, but what if there are actual ways of reducing poverty and improving our economy that doesn’t involve spending a lot of money? What about improving our policies?

living_wage

You see, we’ve made amendments to the ESA before, but during the vast majority of public consultations and recommendations and reports by advocacy groups, we don’t need more amendments, we need a complete overhaul.

Back in March 24th 2013 I wrote “Me as a Number” , a blog post about precarious employment and in it referenced a very popular study conducted by McMaster University, PEPSO and United Way entitled “It’s More than Poverty: Employment Precarity and Household Well-being”.

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To my excitement PEPSO released a new study this year, a follow up to “More than Poverty”, that I couldn’t wait to get my hands on. The new study, “The Precarity Penalty”, focuses on not only the damages precarious employment has on our healthy and on society in general, but also features an in-depth, detailed list of much needed recommendations not only on the Employment Standards act, but for all levels of government, for government agencies and programs and for employers as well.

Another great study that further drives home the need to make significant policy changes is “Still Working on the Edge” by Worker’s Action Centre and Parkdale Community Legal Services in Toronto. This study has a more dedicated focus on the deficiencies of the ESA and has some real, solid recommendations. It was presented during the public consultations this year for The Changing Workplaces Review.

What I wouldn’t have given to have been able to attend those public consultations and listen to all the stories shared. I would have had many to share on my own as I have been hearing examples from friends, family, and most of all clients who have fallen through the cracks left behind by the current ESA.

Here’s a question for my readers: How well do you know your rights as a worker in Ontario?

Who do you think is covered, or not covered by the ESA? What protections do you even have under the ESA?

When your rights as a worker are violated, whats the process to make a complaint?

How does the Ministry of Labour enforce their own laws, and punish employers who break it, what are you entitled to in restitution if you win your case and how does the Ministry of Labour ensure you get compensated?

Walmart_615_330_90

Because here’s what I think: most of you don’t know. 4-5 years ago I didn’t know; I was under the impression that because I lived in Canada I automatically had rights and was protected by the government if anyone tried to treat me unfairly. That 100 years ago, when workers fought their employers for the right to unionize, and all the laws that changed since then, that we had resolved a lot of these issues.

But I was so wrong, and blind, and I bet many Canadians still are. And I’m sorry but we can do so much better.

 

We can implement a living minimum wage above the poverty line. 

We can eliminate exceptions so that all workers no matter the industry have access to the same benefits, whether they are farm labourers, restaurant workers or temporary foreign workers.

We can make sick days mandatory for all workers.

We can protect workers from being fired without cause.

We can make all workers eligible for overtime pay without spreading out the hours over a month.

We can implement harsher penalties for employers who steal wages from their workers, and create a better enforcement unit at the Ministry of Labour so  its easier for workers to make complaints and see their cases resolved sooner.

We can eliminate the loopholes that allow employers to pay different wages or offer different benefits to different employees for the same work.

We can enforce advanced scheduling for jobs that aren’t emergency or essential services, or minimum hours a week for all part time workers.

We can do all of that, and probably a whole lot more. I mean, all of these seem like just basic essentials for a healthy workforce, why is it that hard to implement this?

We work really really hard, I’m pretty sure we deserve it.

hard work.jpg

 

 

 

 

Me as a Number

Here is my own personal experience just to give a realistic perspective on some numbers:

Statistics say that the average person will hold 7 jobs in their lifetime. I am 28 years old, and I’ve had 13 different jobs since I started working at the age of 17. Of all those jobs, only one of them was full time, and had benefits. Of those 13 jobs, I got laid off twice. Another of those jobs was seasonal. I left 2 other part time jobs because the weekly hours reduced by so much that I couldn’t afford to keep working there. And I couldn’t get a second job because even though I wasn’t getting the hours, I was required under contract to be available during evenings and weekends, and couldn’t commit those days elsewhere. I have never earned more than $14 an hour, or worked somewhere for longer than two years. I was even promoted to a supervisory role once, only to be demoted along with my other newly promoted team mates due to “company changes in supervisory roles”.

I went to college twice, and earned a diploma in Career and Work Counselling. And now I’m being turned away from jobs in my field because no one wants to create entry level positions. They want me to spend more money I don’t have on more courses, and some positions want me to have a drivers license and a car. Or a luxuriously expensive university degree. I’m also expected to work as an intern for free to gain experience.

I just started my 13th job. It’s part time and only 26 hours a week. No benefits. And it’s front reception work. But, at least it’s for a non profit organization, which was what I wanted, and I’m loving it there so far. So, despite my turbulent 20’s, I have to say I still feel grateful.

However, I’m 28 years old, with 11 years of work experience, an impressive array of skills and aptitudes, yet in terms of employment, I haven’t progressed much at all. I’ve done all the right things: I’m hard working, reliable, efficient, I’ve taken risks, educated myself; Sure I’ve made mistakes but I’ve grown from them.I have an amazing resume (so I’ve been told) and I interview quite well (so I’ve also been told), and everyone I have worked for has so many great things to say about me. I have great potential, they say. Which begs the question, why can’t I find financial stability after struggling for over a decade to find it?

Truth is, I’m not alone.

The national average for unemployment sits around the 7% mark. However, youth unemployment, ages 16-25, it sits around the 14%. They are also statistically expected to have up to 20 different occupations by the time they retire (however even I think that number is too low). I’m only a few years older, but the situation isn’t far from my own.

I’ve read all the articles, watched documentaries and read countless books on the topic of our lost generation. Heck, I even spent whole courses at school immersed in the social changes that caused this tremendous shift in the labour market. And here I sit, an example.

According to the report on a collaborative study conducted by McMaster University, PEPSO and United Way entitled “It’s More than Poverty: Employment Precarity and Household Well-being”, this is called “precarious employment”, that is, employment that isn’t both permanent or full time. In includes part time work, contract work, work with no pensions or health benefits. Seasonal work or on call positions. Unstable work that offers little to no security or compensation.

And of the Greater Toronto Area, Hamilton and Stoney Creek workforce, a whopping 50% of us have precarious employment. That means half of the working population are in my exact predicament, in constant worry about how we’ll make ends meat, unsure of our futures, frustrated with the mounting pressures placed on us by society. No wonder Depression, anxiety, and bipolar mood disorders are on the rise. 1 in 5 Canadians will suffer from a mental illness at least at some point in their lives.

So, yes, like most of my generation, I feel trapped. I also feel angry because I know it was the corporate greed of the generations before me that caused this, and it was our governments that allowed it, and continue to allow it.

For now, I concentrate on being grateful for what I do have. And a part of me is hopeful that even though my generation is facing tough times ahead, we’ll deal with it, and overcome our obstacles. Maybe this is the generation that will learn to live with less.

I can be a negative pessimist at times, but deep at my core I have faith.

Maybe some good will come out of all of this.

The Coward Behind the Computer Screen

Over the past year, I’ve found myself reading articles, watching videos, and sharing photos (as well as said articles and videos) on my Facebook and twitter pages. I’ve posted on things I’m passionate about: employment, social equality and justice, social support programs and assistance, mental health, poverty, human rights, etc. All I really wanted to do was share the stories. I wanted other people to know about what was going on with the world. Maybe start a dialogue.

However, the world exists not without it’s critics, and some of the comments I received were “well, what are you REALLY doing about it. Posting on social media is nothing more than clicking the “share/retweet” button. That’s not changing the world”.

The mentality of who they think does this: the consumer driven spoiled middle class citizen who sits comfortably behind their computer screen posting articles about human trafficking and homelessness just to give the world the impression that they “care”, but not really doing anything beyond that, essentially contributing nothing to the betterment of society. I think that mentality stems from another negative view, that there really is nothing you CAN do to make a difference to those that suffer from social injustice. That those who are corrupt hold too much power, that the “system” is too complicated to maneuver therefore impossible to change. That initiatives put in place to help others are just band-aid solutions at best, wastes of time at the worst. That criticism bothered me, but not because people misjudged me as a coward behind a computer screen. It bothered me because it raised the question of “what can I REALLY do to truly make a difference? What other actions can I take beyond just sharing these stories?” At the end of the day, I knew it wasn’t enough.

I took those questions as a challenge. And honestly, I hope to be asking myself those same questions for the rest of my life. Because the most important thing is that I am seriously asking myself that question. Many people don’t.

So let’s tackle this question: what am I already doing? You see, I’m not some spoiled middle class pretender. I, just like a big chunk of the population (if you interpret all the graphs and statistics correctly), live below the poverty line. I also post about social issues because I chose to centre my whole career around them. I work at a non-profit, a community health centre that services the disadvantaged members of our society with not just basic but overall health care. I went to college and studied Career and Work Counselling, because I wanted to help people find work, the proverbial “teach a man to fish”. I read books and articles and watch videos not just to keep up with current news, ideas, and information in my field, I also do it because I am passionate about social services and helping people overcome their obstacles. I just couldn’t see myself doing anything else as a career and not be Happy.

So in a way, I’m not just sharing articles, I’m dedicating my life to the improvement of the lives of others, and that’s not just a 9-5 job, that’s something I take home with me too. And I feel a responsibility to not only learn as much as I possibly can about social issues, but to share what I learn with others. Even if I’m judged or criticized for it.

As for what more I can do, well that’s a topic for another day, another blog.

Like I said, I am seriously thinking about that one.

Birth of a Blogger

I’ve changed. A very deep, significant part of myself has changed in the last 6 months.

Queue internal dialogue: how is that any different than the last couple of years, last decade even?
I have done nothing but constantly change or grow throughout my whole twenties.

And hello, I’ve had some pretty significant life changes the past year: I’ve completed my post secondary education (at least for now), set out into the world to start my career (key word I should add is “attempted”, as it is still in progress), I started a deep, meaningful relationship with my boyfriend (my first serious relationship I should add to stress the importance of it), I even got to travel for the first time in 9 years.

Wow, life has really flip-flopped for me.

But that’s not the change I’m talking about. This one runs a little deeper, a little quieter, but incessant and annoying nonetheless. And, in the past 6 months, it has bred an obsession. I found myself reading articles, watching TED videos, following groups, posting and sharing endless stories and pictures on my Facebook wall and on my twitter. I have been soaking myself, educating myself in the world of social injustice and social inequality. All these years of developing a keen sense of self awareness has evolved into a type of awakening to my own surroundings.

And here it is: the world, society in general, is cruel, harsh, and despicable.

Queue internal dialog: I’ve known this since I could tie my own shoe, what’s so revolutionary about the topic now?

Holy Crap, that’s a good question, because I actually don’t know. For some inexplicable reason, I can’t stop thinking about everything I think is wrong with the world. It bugs me, bugs me in a way I can’t shake off or ignore. For some time now I’ve been playing around with the idea of writing about all this noise that’s currently in my head. Giving my ideas a voice. This Blog is where that idea took me.

I want to raise awareness to the many issues that interest me: unemployment, poverty, economics and the job market, social inequality, discrimination, mental health, politics, global issues, human rights… Just to list a few. I’m doing this because a tiny voice in my head tells me it’s important. That it’s something that I CAN do.

Queue internal dialogue: Congratulations, I’m now a blogger.